Julia Rooney

Album, 2022

Oil on wood panel

24h x 24w in

Julia Rooney

OBJ 1001, 2022

Oil on canvas

40h x 40w in

Julia Rooney

OBJ 1211, 2022

Oil and latex paint on canvas

40h x 40w in

101.60h x 101.60w cm

Julia Rooney

OBJ 1117, 2022

Oil on linen with canvases affixed

32h x 32w in

Julia Rooney

OBJ 1115, 2022

oil on linen and canvas

50h x 50w x 2d in

Julia Rooney

OBJ 0923, 2022

Oil on canvas

40h x 40w in

Julia Rooney

OBJ 0316, 2022

Oil on canvas

50h x 50w in

Julia Rooney

OBJ 1024, 2022

Oil on linen

32h x 32w in

Julia Rooney

OBJ 1007, 2022

Latex paint, acrylic and oil on canvas

36h x 36w in

Julia Rooney

OBJ 1108, 2022

Oil on linen

32h x 32w in

Julia Rooney

OBJ 0226, 2021

Latex paint, acrylic, oil and linoleum tile on canvas

72 x 72 in

182.88h x 182.88w cm

 

Julia Rooney

OBJ 0609, 2022

Oil on wood panel

10h x 10w in

Julia Rooney

OBJ 0528, 2022

Acrylic on wood panel

10h x 10w in

JULIA ROONEY

Album

39 Lispenard St

January 20 - February 18, 2023

Freight + Volume is thrilled to present Album, an exhibition of new paintings by Julia Rooney. Album will be on view at 39 Lispenard St. Tribeca, New York, NY 10013. The opening reception will be on Friday, January 20, 2023 | 6:00 - 8:00 PM.

Album will be on view from January 20 - February 18, 2023. This exhibition will be accompanied by a limited-edition artist book.

 

We will be hosting an interactive performance featuring Julia Rooney and Ernest A. Bryant III, L.P.I. on Saturday, February 4, 2023 | 4:00 - 5:30 PM

This conversation will be had both through Zoom and live at the gallery, while the artist interacts with her work, and is in conversation with the avatar of Ernest A. Bryant III. View the press release below entitled CRITICISM + VALUE - IX: JULIA ROONEY for information and details about the event.

Zoom Link for Criticism + Value : https://nyu.zoom.us/j/96608345218 

In person attendance should RSVP: britt@freightandvolume.com

 

 

Album is a show about the peculiar and embodied act of making and seeing a painting. At radically different scales—as small as one’s phone screen to as wide as six feet of social distance—Rooney’s paintings compel the viewer to look and to feel in person, to move their body up close, then far away, and close again. As though adjusting the resolution, viewers may discern detail within each painting, or the choreography between the works as they playfully inhabit the gallery’s architecture. This embodied experience of viewing, where zooming-in and zooming-out yield different information, underscores Rooney’s ongoing fascination with scale as both a formal and conceptual tool for grounding the medium of painting IRL amid the homogenizing forces of our digital screens.

 

Central to this idea of embodiment is the painting process itself. Wielding many types of paint—from latex house paint to oil—Rooney engages in a labor-intensive, manual process that involves pouring, sanding, stitching, scraping, glazing, and gluing. All under the banner of “painting,” these hand-wrought processes are made explicit in the show’s signature painting, Album: a QR-code which hangs in the gallery’s window like an album cover. Referencing recursive coding, Album is a painting about its own making. Scanning the QR code with their phones, passersby are directed to a stop-motion animation showing step-by-step documentation of each brushstroke.

 

Inspired by the way files are titled by phones and computers, the rest of Rooney’s uniformly square paintings all start with OBJ, followed by a number which roughly corresponds to the month and day the painting was started. While all were completed in 2022, some pieces have underpaintings (OBJ 1001) and cut-up canvases (OBJ 0923) started nearly a decade ago. Rooney alludes to digital space through her repetition of pixelated-like passages of varying resolutions (OBJ 0518), network-like webs (OBJ 0316), illusionistic screen-like frames (OBJ 1021), and checkered patterns that suggest binary code. Others, such as OBJ 0226, explicitly riff off Mondrian’s iconic Broadway Boogie Woogie and its ongoing influence on the history of abstraction—a connection further played out through images and texts in the accompanying artist book. In her working and reworking, Rooney casts painting as a process of sustained gathering, where time and haptic knowledge enter the materiality of paint as a kind of glue.